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Senior Care in Evans Can Help Ease Stress on Memory Caregivers

Category Archives: Assisted living and memory care

Dementia and Alzheimer’s Affect More Than Just The Person Diagnosed, And Specialized Communities Can Help

When someone is diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s, a lot of questions arise. Family and friends likely think of their loved one’s needs first. What kind of care will the person need? Who will be responsible for making sure their loved one receives that care? Who will be manage their loved one’s finances, assets, and the logistics of memory care? Will the person stay home, or should they relocate to a memory care community?

With all of the focus on their loved one and their life changes, caregivers often forget their own needs. They may be getting less sleep, missing out on time with their children or spouse, putting their hobbies and relaxation on the back burner, and pushing through the emotional stress of seeing their loved one go through the changes associated with their condition.

Caregiver stress is particularly pronounced when caring for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, compared with caregivers of people without these conditions, twice as many caregivers whose loved ones have dementia or Alzheimer’s indicate substantial emotional, financial and physical difficulties. And families bear an average of 70% of the total lifetime cost of caring for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s.

Over time, caregivers can suffer from extreme stress and burnout in the midst of caring for their loved ones. And if the caregiver burns out, everyone suffers; the person living with dementia or Alzheimer’s is unable to receive quality care, and the caregiver suffers the physical and emotional toll of neglecting their own well-being.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, signs of caregiver stress include denial about your loved one’s condition, anger or frustration that your loved one can no longer do things they once could, or a lack of desire to engage in hobbies or social activities. Caregiver stress can also manifest as anxiety, depression, exhaustion, irritability, sleeplessness, and inability to concentrate. Memory caregivers may also experience physical symptoms like a rapid change in weight or appetite, body aches, migraines or persistent headaches, or getting sick more often or for longer periods of time. Over time, these symptoms can lead to more serious or long-term problems.

If you or someone you know is experiencing caregiver stress or caregiver burnout or would like to avoid the possibility altogether, Specialized Memory Care Communities, such as Marshall Pines Assisted Living and Memory Care in Evans, Georgia, can help. Assisted living and memory care communities can ease caregivers’ stress while providing top-notch, person-centered care to their loved ones.

Marshall Pines is designed to be an all-inclusive, personalized care solution for residents while providing their families with peace of mind. The very architecture of the community was designed for resident safety; residents’ apartments are designed to minimize hazards such as elevation changes and potentially dangerous appliances, and the beautiful grounds encourage daily movement while remaining safe and secure.

And the community’s 24/7 staff and safety features mean that your loved one will never be alone. Professional, caring staff members are available any time day or night. Apartments come with safety pull-cords, and each resident wears a location-based pendant to give residents and their families complete peace of mind.

Marshall Pines also boasts research-backed memory care programming that residents may not be able to get at home. The community’s certified Life Enrichment Director leads engaging daily activities, weekly on-site social events, and fun cultural excursions as part of a researched-backed health and wellness program.

While caregivers may feel responsible for personally caring for their loved ones, a memory care community may be a more appealing option for everyone involved. Not only will residents receive top-of-the-line care, but family members can also avoid the stress associated with being the sole caregiver for their loved one.

If you’re ready to learn more about residency at Marshall Pines Assisted Living and Memory Care, please visit.

Customized Care in a Community Setting Fosters Independence

When your loved one starts to need specialized living assistance or memory care as they age, it can be tough to sort through the available options. You can choose from a multitude of in-home care options as well as several different memory care and assisted living facilities.

But Windsor Heights Assisted Living and Memory Care community in Beechwood, Ohio, stands out above the rest as offering features that ensure each resident receives a personalized, Person-centered experience. The community offers a range of care options, including assisted living, transitional assisted living, and memory care. Each of these fully customized care options includes access to a variety of community features that will ensure both you and your loved one have an amazing experience.

Memory Care Life Enrichment Program

Windsor Heights offers its residents a unique Life Enrichment Program based on the six Sunshine Pillars of Wellness, which include physical engagement, spiritual support, sensory stimulation programming, social connections, intellectual discovery, and emotional expression. This six-pillar philosophy is rooted in a Montessori-style approach, which was originally developed for early childhood education. Windsor Heights has built upon this approach, modifying it to honor the age and experiences of the residents. The program provides sensory stimulation and encourages cognitive stimulation while building on existing social skills. This unique programming enables your loved one to live life to the fullest in a safe and secure environment.

Engaging Activities Calendar

The certified Life Enrichment Director at Windsor Heights leads engaging daily activities, weekly on-site social events, and fun cultural excursions as part of a researched-backed health and wellness program. Residents can choose from multiple activities each day, including physical activities like yoga and chair exercise, as well as mental activities such as Jeopardy, story sessions, and baking class. They can also participate in weekly scenic outings and unique community events each month.

24/7 Dining

Even the dining program at Windsor Heights was intentionally designed for the unique needs of the facility’s residents. The daily menu incorporates foods from the Rush University Medical Center MIND diet, which is intended to foster brain health and ongoing cognitive function. Entrees are served on colored plates to stimulate appetite, and a server greets each resident individually with multiple daily menu choices. Residents can enjoy a meal at any time of the day, and the experienced chef is happy to accommodate residents with dietary needs due to various health restrictions, such as low gluten and sugar-free diets, and much more.

Safe and Secure Location

The entirety of the Windsor Heights community was designed with your loved one’s safety in mind. Each apartment offers a safe and convenient floorplan as well as safety pull cords. Each resident also wears a location-based pendant to provide you with an extra sense of security. The community’s grounds allow residents to enjoy the outdoors in a safe environment. The secured walking paths and enclosed gardens encourage a daily stroll, and residents can rest on the patio area’s comfortable benches to enjoy the beautiful views.

Experienced Staff Available Day and Night

Your loved one will never be alone at Windsor Heights. The community’s team includes a highly-trained Executive Director, licensed Director of Nursing, licensed Memory Care Director, and certified Life Enrichment Director. Each of these professionals, as well as the rest of the staff, are trained to provide customized, person-centered care to each resident, including options for health monitoring, medication management, assistance with dressing, bathing, grooming, and oral care.

To learn more about residency at Windsor Heights Assisted Living and Memory Care, please visit.

Communities Offer a Safer, More Engaging Environment than in-Home Care

Perhaps the time has come when you’ve decided to look for in-home care, assisted living, or a memory care facility for your loved one. Today’s seniors have a multitude of care options available, so it can be a challenge to sort through those options and choose the one that best suits your loved one’s needs.

One of the biggest decisions to make is whether to choose an in-home care service or to relocate your loved one to an assisted living or memory care facility. Memory care needs are unique and not addressed by all home health or senior community options. And while many people’s initial reaction may be to have their loved one stay at home as long as possible, communities may offer a safer, more engaging environment for seniors than in-home care. Here are some things to consider:

Safety

As seniors with memory care need age, the homes they have lived in for years quickly become unsuitable for their new needs. Seniors diagnosed with or experiencing the symptoms of dementia may experience confusion, memory loss, and disorientation, as well as a loss of mobility and/or coordination. The average house, therefore, presents safety risks that you and your loved one may not be aware of. Rugs, flooring and elevation changes, stairs, appliances, and even cramped bathrooms can all contribute to accidents. While modifications may be made at home to alleviate some of these risks, those modifications could be expensive or impossible to implement in certain homes.

Memory care facilities, on the other hand, are designed with these unique safety needs in mind, which keeps your loved one safe and gives you peace of mind. At Quail Ridge in Bartlett, Tennessee, Seniors’ living spaces are designed with consistent flooring with no elevation changes, accessible bathroom safety features, and safety pulls cords to keep them safe and comfortable. Residents also wear location-based pendants to provide their loved ones with peace of mind. And the community grounds are also designed to be both safe and secure as well as conducive to residents living a full, engaged life. Entrances and exits are monitored, and staff is available at all times to assist your loved one.

Memory Care-Specific Programming

While it is possible to provide excellent in-home care to a memory care patient, assisted living and memory care communities offer specially designed programming to support resident’s needs. At Quail Ridge, residents can enjoy programs specifically designed to support their well-being, such as music therapy, aromatherapy, validation techniques, health and wellness activities, and life skills stations. The community also offers a calendar of wellness-related, social, and cultural events to keep residents engaged.;

Even the dining program is designed for the particular needs of memory care residents. Quail Ridge’s daily menu incorporates foods from the Rush University Medical Center MIND diet, which fosters brain health. Entrees are served on colored plates to stimulate appetite, and a server greets each resident individually with multiple daily menu choices. The MIND diet, in conjunction with the community’s many Memory Care programs, is intended to help hold off memory issues for as long as possible.

Socialization

Due to physical and mental limitations, seniors receiving at-home care may have limited contact with others, especially as it becomes difficult for them to participate in their favorite hobbies and social activities. This separation can lead to isolation, loneliness, depression, and a general decline in health. However, senior living communities are designed to provide daily activities, mental stimulation, and social contact for all residents. Community residents living with dementia, Alzheimer’s or other forms of memory impairment benefit from increased socialization; they may experience improved brain health, a sense of belonging, a stronger sense of time and place, and improved focus.

At Quail Ridge, residents can reap these benefits by enjoying the company of their neighbors in the community, participating in a variety of activities and events, and inviting friends and family to visit in the community’s common spaces.

To learn more about the differences between home health care and memory care communities or to schedule a tour of Quail Ridge today, contact our friendly team.

Community Living Can Better Suit Memory Care Needs Than In-Home Options

Seniors today have more choices than ever when it comes to retirement living. And for those experiencing the beginning of memory challenges, and for their families, those options come with an additional set of questions: “What type of care do I actually need?” “How will my needs change as time goes on?” “Which options are the most flexible and will adapt to provide long-term care as my needs change?”

More and more, seniors are choosing community retirement living over in-home care. And memory care needs are unique and not provided for by all home health or senior community options. For memory care patients, dedicated memory care community options can better suit their needs than home care for a variety of reasons.

Community Design

As seniors’ needs change with age, the homes that they lived in during their middle age may not suit them any longer. Stairs, large floorplans, home maintenance, and lack of transportation can make their old homes unmanageable for daily living.

And for memory care patients, the average home presents safety concerns. Conditions like dementia or other memory concerns may affect a person’s spatial awareness and balance, meaning that everyday home features become much more dangerous. Everyday home design is unsuitable for memory care patients, and features such as throw rugs, kitchen appliances, differences in flooring or elevation, and showers without safety features such as handrails, could cause accidents.

And while it is possible to modify the home to limit these risks, dedicated memory care facilities, such as Ashley Gardens, are designed with these concerns in mind. Seniors’ living spaces are designed with consistent, flat flooring, accessible bathroom safety features, and safety pull cords to keep them safe and comfortable. Residents also wear location-based pendants to provide their loved ones with peace of mind. And the community grounds are also designed to be both safe and secure as well as conducive to residents living a full, engaged life.

Specialized Programming

While it is possible to provide excellent in-home care to a memory care patient, assisted living and memory care communities offer specially designed programming to support resident’s needs. At Ashley Gardens, a certified Life Enrichment Director leads to engaging daily activities, weekly on-site social events, and fun cultural excursions as part of a researched-backed health and wellness program. Residents can enjoy programs such as music therapy, aromatherapy, validation techniques, health and wellness activities, and life skills stations.

Even the dining program is designed for the particular needs of memory care residents. Ashley Garden’s daily menu incorporates foods from the Rush University Medical Center MIND diet, which fosters brain health. Entrees are served on colored plates to stimulate appetite, and a server greets each resident individually with multiple daily menu choices. The MIND diet, in conjunction with the community’s many Memory Care programs, is intended to help hold off memory issues for as long as possible.

24/7 Staff Access

At home, it may be difficult for seniors to receive a level of access to professionals similar to what they could experience at an assisted living or memory care community. At Ashley Gardens, the staff includes an Executive Director, a licensed Director of Nursing, a licensed Memory Care Director, and a certified Life Enrichment Director. Professional staff is available 24/7 to assist residents.

Socialization

Due to physical and mental limitations, seniors receiving at-home care may have limited contact with others, especially as it becomes difficult for them to participate in their favorite hobbies and social activities. However, senior living communities are designed to provide daily activities, mental stimulation, and social contact for all residents. Residents can enjoy the company of their neighbors in the community, participate in a variety of activities and events, and invite friends and family to visit in the community’s common spaces.

To learn more about the differences between home health care and memory care communities or to schedule a tour of Ashley Gardens today, contact our friendly team.

Key Differences Between Personal Care, Memory Care, and Assisted Living

Perhaps you’ve woken up and realized that it’s time. Time to seek out options that better nurture your loved one’s physical, emotional, and cognitive health in the midst of cognitive decline. If that’s you, we’re here to help.

The Haven offers specialized Memory Care services in a warm and welcoming environment. One of the most common questions we answer is, “How is a Memory Care facility different than Assisted Living?” We hope this information helps you recognize similarities and differences and ultimately make an informed decision about the care of your loved one.

Living Spaces

Traditionally, assisted living residents to live in apartments or cottages equipped with bedroom(s), bathroom, living room, and kitchen and set up much like home. Contrarily, memory care residents often choose between private rooms or shared rooms and then share common spaces within their communities. Kitchenettes are less common as they pose safety risks and increase anxiety for residents experiencing cognitive decline.

Staffing

Both assisted living and memory care communities offer 24/7 staffing. However, memory care employees receive specialized training to assist them in meeting the physical, emotional, and intellectual needs of memory-impaired residents. These employees are focused primarily in the area of memory care, while assisted living employees may be trained in multiple areas and expected to care for residents in all stages of the aging process.

Programming

Both assisted living and memory care communities offer programming that includes activities designed to promote physical, social, and spiritual wellness among residents. While memory care residents may be able to participate in some assisted living activities, the activity calendar in a memory care community caters to these residents in particular, which means they can participate in any activity they choose. Additionally, activities are selected based on the most recent and relevant research in cognitive impairment to ensure they contribute to the well-being of the resident and assist with memory retention and preventing disease progression.

Safety

The most significant differences between assisted living and memory care communities are related to resident safety. Assisted living communities are designed for residents who are largely independent; that is, they can come and go safely, prepare and cook their own meals, and even manage their own medications if they choose. Contrarily, memory care communities are designed to keep memory-impaired residents safe. Locking up dangerous chemicals, providing safety mechanisms on stoves and ovens, and preventing unmonitored wandering are just a few of the ways that safety is maintained in these specially-designed communities.

Personal care

Both assisted living and memory care communities offer assistance with common activities of daily living, like oral cares, dressing, bathing, meal preparation, medication administration, and housekeeping. There are very few differences between the personal care services available in assisted living communities and those available in memory care communities.

Setting

Research has uncovered that certain colors, furniture placements, and layouts can alleviate anxiety and improve familiarity for residents suffering from memory impairment. Memory care communities base community design and layout on recent research to promote resident wellness and comfort. This is generally not the case for assisted living communities since most residents are relatively independent and the need isn’t as strong.

Overall, there are a number of similarities between assisted living and memory care communities, but a few differences that lead many families to choose specialized memory care facilities over assisted living to promote safety and wellness. To learn more about the Haven or to schedule a tour of our building and grounds, please visit us online, give us a call, or stop by today. We’re excited to learn more about how we can partner with you for your loved one’s care.

*This blog was first published here: Sunshine Retirement Living, August, 2019.

Recognizing Cognitive Decline in Your Friend or Family Member

Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of dementia, affecting 5.7 million Americans today and as many as 14 million by 2050. The onset of Alzheimer’s disease is gradual, making it difficult to differentiate between the normal aging process and the disease process. We hope this information helps you monitor your loved one, work closely with his or her primary care provider, and ensure safety and enrichment despite cognitive changes.

Early or Mild Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease is generally broken into three stages: mild (early), moderate, and severe (late). During the early stages of Alzheimer’s, symptoms are subtle: perhaps your loved one will demonstrate forgetfulness, asking the same question multiple times, or repeating the same story. He or she might begin losing things more often and might take longer to complete activities of daily living, like dressing, brushing their teeth, and bathing. Other common symptoms of early-stage Alzheimer’s include poor judgment (and subsequently questionable decision-making), difficulty paying bills, wandering, getting lost, anxiety, aggression, and mood changes. If you suspect your loved one may be developing Alzheimer’s disease, consult with his or her primary care provider as early as possible. Medications and lifestyle changes can help slow progression and keep your loved one safe and engaged during this stage.

Moderate Alzheimer’s

When your loved one begins to exhibit the signs of moderate Alzheimer’s, supervision and daily assistance become more necessary. It is during early and moderate Alzheimer’s that most residents enter memory care communities like Heritage Point, where their surroundings are safe and activities are customized for their needs. Signs of Alzheimer’s during this stage include:

  • confusion and memory loss that interfere with daily life
  • changes in speech, writing, reading, and math skills
  • distraction; inability to focus for long periods of time
  • difficulty organization thoughts and sentences
  • new behaviors: angry outbursts, vulgar language, impulsiveness, or agitation
  • inability to retain new information or learn new things
  • wandering and getting lost
  • difficulty recognizing family members and friends
  • inability to complete daily tasks correctly: dressing, bathing, brushing teeth, cooking
  • paranoia, delusions, or hallucinations

You may also begin to see some repetitive movements and muscle twitches during moderate Alzheimer’s. If you believe your loved one has entered the moderate stage of Alzheimer’s, consult with their primary care provider to ensure you have the resources you need to support their daily safety and enrichment. Many family members seek help from Heritage Point when 24/7 supervision becomes necessary. Remember, you need time to grieve. The progression of Alzheimer’s disease can cause tremendous pain and loss for those affected, so self-care is critical during this stage.

Late Alzheimer’s

During the final stage of Alzheimer’s disease, the body begins to shut down. Your loved one will most likely become totally dependent on others; that is, somebody will need to perform activities of daily living for them. During this stage, the ability to communicate is lost; decreased appetite and difficulty swallowing lead to unintentional weight loss, and control of the bowel and bladder is lost. Because of these changes, your loved one is at increased risk of other problems like pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and skin sores.

To learn more about the progression of Alzheimer’s disease or explore Mishawaka senior homes, visit us at Heritage Point today. We’re here for you!

The most common differences between natural aging and Alzheimer’s disease

As your loved one ages, it’s common to notice some changes in memory and cognitive function; perhaps they struggle to recall the name of a grandchild or miss an eye appointment. But how do you know whether these changes are part of the normal aging process or an indication of something more serious, like Alzheimer’s disease?

Here, our experts answer some of the most common questions they receive about the differences between aging and Alzheimer’s disease.

Q: My mom seems to be getting more forgetful. Is this common or should I be concerned about Alzheimer’s dementia?

A: Forgetfulness often increases with age and can be very normal. Forgetting an appointment, for example, is a sign of normal aging, while forgetting how to get to the clinic or back home afterward could be a warning signal of something more serious. If you notice your mom is struggling to remember the events of last week or yesterday, doesn’t recognize close loved ones, or struggles with daily tasks like cooking or getting home from the store, seek guidance from her primary care provider. These can be signs of Alzheimer’s.

Q: I’m the primary caregiver for my uncle, and lately his behavior has changed. He often says inappropriate things and sometimes becomes combative. Is this a normal part of aging?

A: When we see somebody, who is normally mild-mannered display combative and inappropriate behaviors, we worry that something more serious is going on. In some cases, the diagnosis is Alzheimer’s – but don’t jump to conclusions. Sometimes the diagnosis is simply a urinary tract infection, which can cause behavior changes in older patients. Seeing a doctor is critical if you notice behavioral or personality changes in your loved one. Please note that caring for a loved with dementia can be very challenging, so be sure to care for yourself while you seek the treatment he needs.

Q: My dad has really withdrawn lately. He spends a lot of time alone and doesn’t engage much when I stop by. Is this a sign of dementia?

A: Many aspects of aging can contribute to sadness, withdrawal, fatigue, and disengagement. Loss of a spouse, living alone, poor nutrition, and decline in health can all increase the risk of depression. However, the signs and symptoms of depression sometimes closely mimic the signs of Alzheimer’s, so it’s important to share your concerns with a doctor to ensure your dad receives the right treatment.

Q: It seems like my mom’s physical health is declining all at once. Is it possible this is Alzheimer’s disease?

A: While early and moderate dementia produce primarily mental and emotional changes, the body shuts down when disease reaches late stage. Symptoms of moderate to severe or late-stage dementia include incontinence, loss of speech, seizures, loss of muscle control, and difficulty swallowing, among others. However, most people progress through the disease over a long period of time, so it’s unlikely that you would see physical decline first. What you describe could be caused by something else; schedule an appointment with your primary care doctor to find out for sure.

To learn more about Alzheimer’s disease or memory care services in the Reno area, visit our team at Stone Valley Retirement Living on Stone Valley Drive today. We’re here to help you navigate these complex and challenging years.

Windsor Heights offers cutting-edge memory care programs

The team at Windsor Heights in Beachwood sets the bar high when it comes to memory care. Specifically, it is their life’s work to ensure that those with dementia are afforded the same compassionate, luxurious retirement experience as their peers. Here’s how they do it.

First, because moving can be traumatic on those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia, the community offers a multi-level care structure that promotes seamless transition between levels of care. This gives residents the opportunity to stay in the community – alongside familiar, trusted caregivers – despite changes in their physical or cognitive ability, promoting a sense of safety and security and avoiding disruption in their lives.

Apartments and common areas are designed according to Circadian Rhythm concepts, using lighting, furnishings, and decor to promote familiarity, comfort, and calmness. Although the science behind it is complex, the result is really quite simple: residents feel at home at Windsor Heights. It is our hope that when they step into our community – and especially into their suite – that they feel the same warmth and comfort they felt at home.

Staff receive specialized training, empowering them to cater their interactions to the needs of the memory-impaired residents by incorporating gentle touch and positive reassurances into every encounter. The person-centered programming extends to outdoor areas, which are secure and monitored to give residents the opportunity to explore independently if they’d like. By offering secure outdoor areas, residents never have to wait for scheduled outdoor time to enjoy the smell of fresh air or the sound of leaves rustling in the breeze. As a secondary benefit, residents remain active – which comes with a myriad of additional advantages.
Because evidence shows that participation in purposeful daily living activities can give memory care residents a sense of purpose, life skill stations replicate the chores that many of our residents remember fondly – folding towels, baking cookies, and gardening are just a few examples. The life enrichment program, offered above and beyond life skill stations, gives residents the opportunity to participate in intellectual, social, physical, and spiritual activities throughout the day. Residents choose the activities that speak to their interests and no resident is ever turned away; in fact, the schedule is designed specifically for those with memory impairment.

Finally, Windsor Heights incorporates memory care into every detail down to the nourishment your loved one receives in their care. Working within the recommendations of Rush University Medical Center and the MIND Diet, the executive chef and his culinary team provide meals and snacks designed to reduce the risk of develop Alzheimer’s by up to 53% and help those who already have the disease maintain cognitive function longer.

To learn more about memory care or schedule a tour of the luxurious Windsor Heights community, visit us online or give us a call. Our friendly staff are standing by and look forward to meeting you and learning more about your needs.

Memory Care Residents at Higher Risk of Heat Injuries

The sun burns a little hotter in Tucson than it does in most places, which means enjoying the summer sun requires a little more planning for us than it does for other folks. Here’s how we’ve been beating the heat this summer while still enjoying time outdoors.

#1 – Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate

Residents who are memory-impaired are at highest risk of dehydration, so staff make a concentrated effort to encourage fluid intake when it’s hot outside. One of the most effective strategies we use is offering a drink with every single encounter; we find when we offer, they often accept our invitation and enjoy a cold drink of water. We also replenish ice often to keep their water cold and palatable and offer fun, creative drinks from time to time to make hydration exciting.

#2 – Enjoy the outdoors after sundown

When it’s too hot to sit on the lanai during the day, we plan our outdoor activities around the heat. For example, an evening game of bean bag toss or some early morning birdwatching might be on the agenda instead of mid-afternoon gardening. This strategy keeps us from spending summer months cooped up inside, missing out on all the benefits nature has to offer.

#3 – Let residents choose their comfort zone

If you’ve ever shared an office, you know that “room temperature” means a little something different to everybody. Individually-controlled suites ensure that every resident can enjoy air conditioning and choose their own just-right temperature. We gauge comfort often by asking questions like, “Are you warm enough?” or “Would you like it a little cooler in here?” and then respond accordingly by adjusting the thermostat, grabbing a warm blanket, or hanging up the cardigan for a while.

#4 – Use the excuse for a sweet treat

Sweet treats are the stuff of summer and cold sweet treats can not only be reminiscent of childhood but also help residents stay cool and hydrated. We might hail an ice cream truck or order sweet treats in advance to help residents cool down and celebrate the heat the summer.

#5 – Prevent sun burn

Sun burn is a top concern during the summer months in Tucson, so we make a focused effort to protect our residents’ skin while they enjoy the outdoors. We encourage hat and sunscreen use (and help residents apply it), offered covered spaces for outdoor relaxation, and remind residents to don their sunglasses and protect their eyes. Residents are monitored for safety when outdoors, so staff intervene if they notice any safety concerns.

Memory impairment can make Tucson summer dangerous. By choosing a community designed especially for residents who at risk due to memory impairment, you provide your loved with an opportunity to enjoy retirement the way they always wanted to without risking safety and security.

To learn more about Copper Canyon, our Tucson Memory Care community, stop by today. We’d love to schedule time to show you around, introduce you to our residents, and give you a taste of our gourmet menu.

Pros of a Memory Care Facility Versus In-Home Care in Tallahassee

Seniors have over 70 options to consider when making decisions about memory care

Today’s seniors have more options than ever before when it comes to assisted living and memory care services. In fact, a quick online search of “assisted living near me” will reveal that Tallahassee alone boasts 57 agencies that offer home health in some form and over a dozen senior living communities. This leaves most seniors wondering, “What’s the difference and which option is best for me?”

Memory care needs are unique and not addressed by all home health or senior community options. Here, we’ll share some of the main advantages of choosing a memory care facility over in-home care to help you narrow down your options and make the most informed decision

  • Safety. Memory care communities are designed with your loved one’s safety in mind. Seniors diagnosed with or experiencing the symptoms of dementia are at increased risk of trips, falls, burns, and medication errors. Memory care facilities are designed with the unique safety needs of your friend or family member in mind to limit the risk of injuries and give you peace of mind. While modifications can be made at home, such as installing handrails and removing rugs, some innate safety risks can be challenging to alleviate.
  • Security. Memory care communities are secure. When targeted by burglars and other criminals, the elderly are more likely to suffer physical injury, financial loss, and psychological trauma than younger victims. Choosing a memory care community ensures controlled access to the building and 24/7 staffing for your loved one’s security and peace of mind.
  • All-inclusive pricing. While not all memory care communities in Tallahassee follow an all-inclusive model, Azalea Gardens offers this model and complete transparency for convenience in budgeting. This gives you all the information you need to predict expenses accurately from one month to the next and make projections about long-term affordability. In-home care, on the other hand, is accompanied by all of the normal fluctuations of living at home, i.e. high electric bills during peak months, home maintenance expenses, etc.
  • Quick response time. The risk of serious medical events like heart attack and stroke increase with age, which makes it more imperative than ever before to have quick and easy ways for your loved one to request help and staff nearby to respond quickly. While home health care can be staffed 24/7, the cost is often a restrictive burden for families. Additionally, those receiving health services at home generally have to pay for additional service in order to have a panic button or other alert device.
  • Socialization. The benefits of socialization for those suffering from dementia and other forms of memory impairment are many: improved brain health, a sense of belonging, a stronger connection to time and place, and enhanced focus. Seniors who receive in-home care are at higher risk of isolation and the “ripple” effects (loneliness, depression, decline, etc.), while those living in communities have ample opportunities for socialization and all of the assistance they need to participate in activities tailored to their needs

Azalea Gardens Assisted Living & Memory Care, located on Ox Bottom Road in Tallahassee, is a beautiful memory care facility designed with the well-being of your friend or family member in mind. To learn more, schedule a site visit with our compassionate team today.