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Long-Term Care Facilities Are Preparing For COVID-19 Protections

Category Archives: Community Stories

Marshall Pines Staff Are Doing Everything Possible To Protect Residents

Millions of people across the world have been impacted by the spread of the coronavirus, and people everywhere have been subject to various stay-at-home orders, travel restrictions, and other regulations intended to slow the spread and lessen the impact of the virus. Long-term care facilities like Marshall Pines Assisted Living and Memory Care in Evans, Georgia, are certainly no exception.

Indeed, because seniors are at a higher risk for the development of serious complications from the virus, retirement communities like Marshall Pines are taking extra precautions to keep their residents safe.

Because of the way the virus spreads, it is essential that very specific practices be put in place to protect residents and staff from contracting the virus. The more people residents or staff come in contact with, the more likely they are to catch or spread COVID-19. That’s because the virus spreads in close quarters. When someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth, which may contain the virus. People in the area can possibly breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus, if the person coughing or sneezing is infected. The more people in an area, and the closer they are together, the faster the disease could potentially spread. Because residents in a senior living facility live close together and interact regularly with other residents and staff, it is especially necessary to take precautions to protect them.

To protect our senior loved ones, the CDC recommends that senior living facilities restrict visitors, regularly check healthcare workers and residents for fevers and symptoms, and limit activities within the facility to keep residents safe from the potential spread of the virus.

The team at Marshall Pines has followed these CDC recommendations and implemented the following measures in order to protect residents:

Visitation policies have temporarily changed

While Marshall Pines is normally excited to welcome family and friends to visit, during this time, visitation policies have temporarily changed at the community in order to protect residents from the coronavirus. Visitation is now restricted. In addition, all people entering the community will be screened at the front door, including residents and staff.

And while the community’s doors are still open to new residents, all community tours will be conducted virtually. Additional screening processes will be implemented for new residents to ensure all current residents remain safe.

Staff is prepared to respond

The trained and licensed staff at Marshall Pines is always available 24/7 to assist residents with anything they need. But during this time, the community’s leadership has made certain that every single member of the community’s staff is knowledgeable about the community’s virus precautions and procedures, as well as any changes. In addition, the community is in contact with state and local health officials for the most up-to-date information on how to care for and protect both residents and caregivers.

And while the staff members at Marshall Pines are always conscious of the cleanliness of the community, that is even more true now, as staff members are being extra-diligent about cleaning and disinfecting frequently-used surfaces.

Social distance is being maintained, but so are social connections

While the CDC recommends physically distancing residents and restricting visitation during the COVID-19 outbreak, it is still possible to connect with our loved ones digitally. Loneliness and isolation can have a negative impact on the well-being and the immune system. Therefore, to alleviate the strain of social isolation around this situation, the staff at Marshall Pines are helping to facilitate video conferencing and other virtual communication tools between residents and their loved ones. You can also connect with Marshall Pines on Facebook to get the most updated information from the community and keep up with the community’s activities.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of Marshall Pines, contact our friendly team today.

Preventative Measures Are in Place to Protect Residents at This Reno Memory Care Facility

To say that Coronavirus has had an impact on the world might be an understatement. But for seniors, especially those living in retirement communities, the impact has been even more dramatic. Seniors are a high-risk group according to the CDC and WHO. And because the virus is spread in close quarters, seniors living in retirement communities are at a greater risk of contracting the virus if a resident or staff member should become infected. Luckily, retirement communities, like Stone Valley Assisted Living and Memory Care community in Reno, Nevada, are taking precautions to keep senior residents, a particularly vulnerable population during this challenging time, safe.

Keeping Up to Date on CDC and WHO Recommendations

As researchers and officials discover more about the virus, and as more data is collected, it’s important that retirement communities remain up to date on changing recommendations and projections. Stone Valley has read and implemented recommendations from the CDC and WHO about disinfection, social distancing, hand washing, masks, and other virus prevention measures. In addition, the community is in contact with state and local health officials for the most up-to-date information on how to care for and protect both residents and caregivers.

The trained and licensed staff at Stone Valley is always available 24/7 to assist residents with anything they need. But during this time, the community’s leadership has made certain that every single member of the community’s staff is knowledgeable about the community’s virus precautions and procedures, as well as any changes.

Limiting Residents’ Exposure to the Public

The coronavirus spreads in close quarters. When someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth, which may contain the virus. People in the area can possibly contract COVID-19 if the person coughing or sneezing is infected.

In a tight-knit retirement community like Stone Valley, it is important to ensure that nobody who has contracted the virus or is showing symptoms is allowed inside the community. To prevent both staff and residents from unnecessary exposure to the coronavirus, Stone Valley has temporarily altered its visitation policies according to the recommendations from the CDC. While the community is normally open for family and friends to visit, visitation policies have temporarily changed. During this time, visitation is restricted. In addition, all people entering the community are being screened at the front door for symptoms or exposure to the virus, including residents and staff.

While the community’s doors are still open to new residents, all community tours will be conducted virtually. Additional screening processes will be implemented for new residents to ensure all current residents remain safe.

Disinfecting Surfaces

Unfortunately, close human contact is not the only way the virus can spread. When an infected person coughs or sneezes, the droplets they release could also land on surfaces and survive for anywhere from a few hours up to several days. The CDC recommends cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces daily. The staff at Stone Valley have always been diligent about maintaining a clean and healthy environment for residents, but they are going above and beyond to ensure that surfaces within the community are clean and germ-free.

Remaining Alert and Resident-Focused

The trained and licensed staff at Stone Valley are not only familiar with the new policies and procedures put in place to prevent the spread of the coronavirus but also familiar with each and every resident and their unique needs. Staff members continue to provide residents with their usual Person-Centered care, ensuring that their routines and healthy practices remain in place.

This is the new normal, for now. The preventative measures above work to keep the virus at bay, but if any virus-related issues were to arise in the community, Stone Valley staff are prepared to take action to contain the spread.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of Stone Valley, contact our friendly team today.

Tucson Retirement Community Has Made Essential Changes in Response to the Coronavirus

The global spread of the coronavirus has impacted nearly every country in the world, and most people are currently subject to travel restrictions, quarantine, shelter-in-place orders, or other restrictions implemented to slow the spread of the virus. But for seniors living in retirement communities, extra precautions are necessary. Because seniors are at a higher risk, retirement communities like Copper Canyon are taking extra precautions to keep their residents safe.

Because of the way the virus spreads, it is essential the very specific practices be put in place to protect residents and staff from contracting the virus. Residents in senior living facilities live closely together and interact regularly with other residents and staff. And the more people residents or staff come in contact with, the more likely they are to catch or spread COVID-19. That’s because the virus spreads in close quarters. When someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth, which may contain the virus. People in the area can possibly breathe in the droplets, including the coronavirus if the person coughing or sneezing is infected. The more people in an area, and the closer they are together, the faster the disease could potentially spread.

Because the risk of transmission and complications are much higher for senior retirement community residents, it’s not enough to follow the bare minimum guidelines from the CDC and WHO. Copper Canyon has gone above and beyond to keep their residents safe.

We’re up to date on the latest recommendations from the CDC and WHO

As researchers and officials discover more about the virus, and as more data is collected, it’s important that retirement communities remain up to date on changing recommendations and projections. Copper Canyon has read and implemented recommendations from the CDC and WHO about disinfection, social distancing, hand washing, masks, and other virus prevention measures. In addition, the community is in contact with state and local health officials for the most up-to-date information on how to care for and protect both residents and caregivers.

The trained and licensed staff at Copper Canyon are always available 24/7 to assist residents with anything they need. But during this time, the community’s leadership has made certain that every single member of the community’s staff is knowledgeable about the community’s virus precautions and procedures, as well as any changes. And while the staff members at Copper Canyon are always conscious of the cleanliness of the community, that is even more true now, as staff members are being extra-diligent about cleaning and disinfecting frequently-used surfaces.

Visitation policies have temporarily changed

To prevent both staff and residents from unnecessary exposure to the coronavirus, Copper Canyon has temporarily altered its visitation policies according to the recommendations from the CDC. While the community is normally excited to welcome family and friends to visit, during this time, visitation policies have temporarily changed and visitation is now restricted. In addition, all people entering the community are being screened at the front door, including residents and staff.

And while the community’s doors are still open to new residents, all community tours will be conducted virtually. Additional screening processes will be implemented for new residents to ensure all current residents remain safe.

Staff is on alert and resident-focused

The trained and licensed staff at Copper Canyon are not only familiar with the new policies and procedures put in place to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, staff members are also familiar with each and every resident and their needs. Should any resident display symptoms or simply act unlike themselves, staff members are ready to get to the root of the problem immediately.

With these measures in place, Copper Canyon is confident it is keeping residents safe.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of Copper Canyon, contact our friendly team today.

Simple Behavior Changes Are “Flattening The Curve” of COVID-19

The coronavirus has affected nearly every country and community in the world. Here in the United States, most communities are subject to stay-at-home orders and travel restrictions. These measures, along with some simple recommended behavioral changes from the CDC and WHO, are helping to “flatten the curve,” or reduce the total number of people infected by the virus.

To help empower people to protect themselves, Dunwoody Pines Retirement Community in Dunwoody, Georgia, has put together an explanation of some simple measures you can take to protect yourself, and how they work.

Limit your public exposure

Because of the way the virus spreads, stay-at-home orders, travel restrictions, and social distancing are necessary to keep the virus from moving from person to person. That’s because the virus spreads in close quarters. When someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth, which may contain the virus. People in the area can possibly breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus, if the person coughing or sneezing is infected.

A simple way to protect yourself is to limit your exposure to strangers, anyone displaying symptoms of the virus, and anyone who does not live in your home with you. Try to limit shopping trips to once per week, and work from home if at all possible. When you do have to go out, the CDC recommends leaving a 6-foot space between you and others in order to limit the close contact that can result in the virus spreading.

Disinfect surfaces

When an infected person coughs or sneezes, the droplets they release could also land on surfaces and survive for anywhere from a few hours up to several days. If someone were to touch such a surface and then touch their face, they could become infected with the virus.

The CDC recommends cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces daily. These surfaces include tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, tablets, remotes, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

Remember that cleaning and disinfecting are two different processes! If surfaces are dirty, clean them with soap and water first. Then, use a disinfectant such as a bleach or alcohol solution to kill any bacteria or viruses present on the surface.

Wash your hands often

Because you never know when you may touch an infected surface, it’s important to wash your hands several times throughout the day, especially prior to eating, preparing food, or touching your face.

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not available, you can use a hand sanitizer; the CDC recommends using a product that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of our hands and rub them together until they feel dry. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Watch carefully for symptoms

Even if you don’t think you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus, check in with yourself daily and monitor carefully for symptoms. The symptoms of the virus can appear anywhere from 2-14 days after your exposure to the virus. According to the CDC, symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. The CDC states that if you know you were exposed to someone with the virus, or if you have any of these symptoms, stay away from others (including other people and pets in your home) and stay home except to seek medical care.

With just these few simple changes, you can limit your chances of exposure to the coronavirus and help prevent illness.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of Dunwoody Pines, contact our friendly team today.

Reimagining Celebrations During COVID-19

Are you down in the mouth because your plans to create the best 80th birthday bash ever for your mother have gone up in flames? If so, there are two reasons you shouldn’t let the temporary kibosh on gatherings, crowds, and parties, prevent you from honoring Mom on her special day. One: In a time of social distancing, your loved one may need a little festiveness to pick up her spirits. And two: Yes, it is quite possible to celebrate without risking the spread of the COVID-19 virus—it just takes a little inventiveness.

You may already have read about the countless drive-by birthday parades that are popping up across the continent– cars decked out in balloons and signs, with drivers joyously honking their horns to birthday boys and girls of all ages including nonagenarians. (In one drive-by parade, well-wishers used crutches and broomsticks to extend gifts to a California teen.) In some cases, friends park in front of their friend’s home and party from inside their vehicle. Then too, some folks stand outside the homes of their friends and neighbors—six feet apart, of course– singing happy birthday or holding up birthday signs and balloons, as they did earlier this spring for a 95-year-old.

A practical and fun way to celebrate

Still, stand-by or drive-by parties might not be realistic in your case. Luckily, Zoom can come to the rescue! (At Sunrise Retirement video chats are among the most popular ways for family members to connect. If your loved one is not comfortable with technology, ask our Life Enrichment Director to facilitate a video-call, and keep in mind that your loved one doesn’t need a smart device, as all our communities have iPads.)

If you chose to go with a video-call, keep in mind that a birthday chat is a little different than an everyday call. Before the video-chat, remember to do your hair and to choose a nice dress or shirt and pants instead of sweat pants and T-shirt. Pay attention to the background as well. Hang some balloons and display some photos of your loved one as well as other family photos in the background. Make your virtual time together special by adding a creative activity. Perhaps you (or your kids) could compose and read a birthday poem, or create and display a watercolor or drawing, or, better yet, serenade Mom with favorite songs.

You can also go one step further and arrange to eat dinner together over Zoom. Ideally, organize it so that you are both are eating the same meal. Perhaps you could cook Mom’s favorite food (including special dessert) and drop it off to her community. Another alternative: Pay a local restaurant to deliver her a delicious meal and scrumptious dessert. Back at your place, make sure to do the meal in style—pull out the good china, nice napkins or tablecloth, and arrange a vase of flowers.

Create a virtual theme party

You could also bump up the celebration by organizing a Zoom birthday party, perhaps based on a theme, like your mother’s favorite era. Then, ask her best friends and family members to don their swing dresses or tie dye skirts when they come on the call to pay tribute to her. Don’t forget to ask your loved one to sign on a few minutes later than others so the party-goers can sing happy birthday to her. Another reminder: make sure to ask invitees to bring their own cake!

Remember, on special days the most important thing is honoring and connecting with your parent. With a little bit of planning, coordination and creativity you just might be able to create a celebration your Mom will remember for years. Just because we’re in lockdown doesn’t mean we have to put a lid on festivities.

*This blog was first published here: Sunshine Retirement Living, April 2020.

Try These Tips as You’re Transitioning Into the Role of Caregiver For Your Loved One

When your loved one starts showing signs of needing memory care assistance, you may be required to start filing an entirely new role of caregiver. And even if you’ve served as a caregiver for other people before, providing care to a loved one with memory challenges is likely to be a completely different experience.

As you’re transitioning to this new role, these tips from Copper Canyon Assisted Living and Memory Care in Tucson, Arizona, can help:

Start with love and empathy

When your loved one begins to show signs of memory challenges, it can be frustrating for you as the caregiver to see the changes they are experiencing. Even though emotions can be running high, try to actively empathize with your loved one and interact with them from a place of love. Try to look at things from your loved one’s perspective—how would you feel if you were in your loved one’s situation, experiencing the challenges they are experiencing? How would you want someone to interact with you?

As you’re navigating these new waters, you’re bound to make mistakes—you’re human, after all. But as long as you’re doing your best, learning as much as you can, and treating for your loved one with plenty of empathy and love, you will be a successful caregiver.

Define success based on your loved one’s needs

As your loved one faces these new challenges, be sure that your expectations of success are in line with their needs and abilities. As their caregiver, you may wish to see them enjoy life exactly as they did before, without any limitations or adjustments. But if that is your only idea of success, you may be setting yourself up for disappointment. Instead, redefine what success as a caregiver means based on your loved one’s needs rather than your own expectations.

Success as a caregiver means ensuring that your loved one is as comfortable, safe, and happy as possible. And it’s likely that each day will look different—some days will be better than others. But if you’ve done your best to focus on your loved one’s comfort, safety, and happiness, you can consider your day successful!

Understand your loved one’s condition thoroughly

As a caregiver, you will be taking on the responsibility of being in charge of your loved one’s medications, schedule, and safety, as well as other aspects of their life. To take charge successfully, you’ll need to thoroughly understand your loved one’s needs and their doctors’ recommendations for any medical conditions.

Be sure that you are familiar with any medications your loved one is taking, as well as their medication schedule. Ensure that you’re aware of any symptoms or conditions you should be monitoring, as well as any warning signs to watch out for. Finally, talk to your loved one’s doctor about how to regularly reassess and evaluate your loved one’s needs, and when to modify their care plan.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help

Being the sole caregiver for a loved one experiencing memory challenges can be a taxing job. If you need a break, some additional assistance, or for experienced professionals to take over your loved one’s care, it may be advantageous to find a memory care facility like Copper Canyon.

If you’re going out of town or simply need a break to care for yourself, the community offers short-term and respite stay options for your loved one. They’ll be able to enjoy the facility’s programs, amenities, and experienced staff, and you’ll have peace of mind that they are in good hands.

If your loved one’s needs have changed such that they would benefit from 24/7 professional care, Copper Canyon is ready to welcome them with open arms. The community provides specialized memory care programming to support your loved one’s needs, and you’ll be impressed with the comfortable rooms and luxury amenities.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of Copper Canyon, contact our friendly team today.

Looking for an Assisted Living Community in Pittsburgh? Consider a Personal Care Community For Your Loved One

When the time has come to choose a facility for a loved one who needs daily assistance, the choices can be a little confusing. What type of community would serve their needs best? What amenities and care options do you want them to have access to?

The Haven at North Hills Personal Care and Memory Care Facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, embraces seniors in need of assistance with daily activities, personal care, or memory care. The Haven is not an assisted living facility, but rather a luxury personal care and memory care community that can give you complete peace of mind that your loved one is safe, happy, and healthy.

The Haven goes beyond assisted living

Much like a traditional assisted living community, The Haven offers access to medical care, health and wellness programming, emergency call systems, and 24-hour staff supervision to keep your loved one safe and healthy. The community also offers housekeeping, laundry services, social activities, an and all-day gourmet dining program providing three meals a day.

But the Haven at North Hills Senior Residence also offers some benefits that traditional assisted living communities may not offer, including specialized programming designed to enhance the lives of those with memory impairment, kitchen-free apartments to reduce stress and improve safety for residents, and safety checks from qualified staff.

Daily Rhythm Programming enriches residents’ lives

At The Haven, a certified Life Enrichment Director leads the residents in engaging daily activities, weekly on-site social events, and fun cultural excursions as part of a researched-backed health and wellness program. The community’s activities focus on four key pillars of enrichment: Social connection, spiritual support, emotional expression, and intellectual discovery.

To ensure residents receive ample social connection, activities are offered in both large and small group settings that encourage opportunities for socialization, relationship-building, and community amongst residents and team members.

The community also provides residents with spiritual support by recognizing and embracing the needs of each residents’ spirituality through music, discussion, prayer, affirmations, nature, and other diverse means.

The Haven creates opportunities for residents to engage in past passions like art therapy, cooking projects, volunteerism, vocational skills, reminiscing, doll therapy, music therapy, and pet therapy visits.

Finally, the staff promotes brain cognition with educational activities that reflect the interests of the residents’ past professions, lifestyles, and hobbies.

Special Memory Care programming serves those with memory challenges

Traditional nursing homes or assisted living facilities are equipped to handle persons with assisted living needs, but they lack the staff training and infrastructure needed to nurture those with memory challenges such as dementia or Alzheimer’s. In contrast, as dedicated personal care and memory care facility, the Haven takes a holistic approach to provide the very best care for your loved one experiencing memory challenges.

The Haven combines Person-Centered Care with an extensive Memory Care Life Enrichment Program that encompasses the six Sunshine Pillars of Wellness through physical, social, emotional, cognitive, sensory, and spiritual nurturing. This specialized programming enables your loved one to live life to the fullest in a safe and secure environment.

Memory care at The Haven includes research-backed activities such as music therapy, where residents can experience era-specific music to bring back fond memories and decrease anxiety. Residents also experience the community’s Life Skills Stations, where miniature kitchens, faux engines, and mailboxes are among the many real-life scenarios and work the residents did in their youth. The community’s specialized memory care programming also includes socialization, validation techniques, spiritual support, and health and wellness activities.

When looking for a warm, comfortable community for a loved one who needs daily assistance or memory care, look no further than The Haven at North Hills Personal Care and Memory Care Facility and its caring, professional staff.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of The Haven at North Hills Senior Residence, contact our friendly team today.

Winter Can Make You Feel Sluggish, But These Tips From Belleview Heights Can Help

Once the holidays are over, reality sets in—there really are at least two more months of cold weather and early sunsets to contend with before spring arrives. Science has shown that the “winter blues” are a real phenomenon; colder weather, shorter days, and less time spent outdoors in the fresh air can impact your mood and energy levels.

But even in the dead of winter, there are things you can do to boost your mood and counteract the effects of the season. The memory care professionals at Belleview Heights Assisted Living and Memory Care in Aurora, Colorado, are experts at keeping their residents happy during the dreary winter months. Next time you’re feeling a little down this winter, try these tips from Belleview Heights:

Get as much sunlight as possible

Bright light, especially sunlight, increases the levels of the mood-boosting hormone serotonin in your system. If the cold is bearable where you live, bundle up and take a short walk outside on a sunny day. Breathing fresh air and exposing your body to the bright light should boost your mood quickly.

If it is simply too cold to head outside, you can instead sit next to a bright window to get the benefits of sun exposure. That way, you can enjoy the warmth of the indoors while absorbing the beautiful sunlight. Choose a favorite TV show, a hobby, or a good book to enjoy while you sit, as you’ll likely see the greatest benefits after thirty minutes or more.

If your environment is too gray and cloudy and the sun never peeks into your window, you can try using a sun lamp—a small, extremely bright light that is specially created to emit light as close as possible to sunlight, approximating natural sun exposure. Thirty minutes of exposure to a sun lamp can have the same effects as sitting near a bright, sunlit window.

Check your Vitamin D levels

Our skin naturally produces vitamin D when exposed to sunlight. But in the winter months, when days are shorter and the weather keeps us from going outside, we can run low on this necessary vitamin. That’s not a good thing, as studies have shown that vitamin D may play a role in preventing disease and warding off depression, particularly seasonal depression.

Luckily, vitamin D supplements are readily available to replace the vitamin D we aren’t able to generate during winter’s cold, dark days. Check with your doctor about whether you need a Vitamin D supplement, and where to find a suitable one.

Get some exercise

It is no secret that exercise helps the brain produce endorphins, chemicals that act as analgesics, which means they diminish the perception of pain. Endorphins also trigger feelings of happiness.

Regular exercise has been proven to ward off depression, relax the body, improve sleep, and boost self-esteem. All of those effects can combat the winter blues.

If you normally get your exercise outdoors and the winter weather has foiled your plans, switch to some indoor activities to get your body moving until you’re able to head outdoors again.

Treat yourself to some extra sleep

You may have noticed that you feel as if you need to sleep more in the wintertime. You’re not imagining it—there are biological reasons why you may need some extra sleep in the winter.

First, the shorter daylight hours affect your internal circadian clock, which tells your body when to sleep and when to wake up. Because the sun sets earlier in the winter, your internal clock sends the signal that it’s time to go to bed much earlier in the winter than in the summer. Second, your body requires more energy to maintain its internal temperature and regular functions in the winter. That translates to extra calories burned and feeling like you need some extra shut-eye.

Don’t fight the feeling! Trying to maintain your regular sleep schedule even when your body is crying out for more sleep will make you cranky throughout the day, and it will only make your energy levels dip further. To beat the winter blues, treat yourself to some extra sleep.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of Belleview Heights, contact our friendly team today.

Winter Moves Sound Like a Nightmare, but Marshall Pines Makes it a Breeze

Moving is difficult at any time of the year. Packing, selling or donating unwanted items, and dealing with showings and closings aren’t most people’s favorite things to do. And in the winter, you can count on additional moving challenges: freezing temperatures, ice and snow on the roads, and shorter daylight hours. With those additional hassles, many people would prefer to put off relocating until spring.

But Marshall Pines Assisted Living and Memory Care community in Evans, Georgia, not only has great tips to make your loved one’s winter move easy, but the community also offers an incredible Easy-Move program that can make their move to Marshall Pines no problem at all.

If you’re planning a winter move to a new retirement community, these tips will help:

Keep your eyes on the weather

Winter weather can be unpredictable. When it comes time to move, you’ll likely be crossing your fingers for a clear, mild day. But you’ll have to be prepared for any winter weather typical for your climate—that could mean anything from freezing rain to ice, snow, sleet, or temperatures that could stiffen the joints and sting the skin of even the most experienced movers.

Leading up to your loved one’s move, monitor the weather report. And just in case Mother Nature surprises you with a snowstorm the meteorologist didn’t see coming, ensure you have a backup plan or alternative moving date set up with your moving company.

Plan the move from start to finish

To make sure that everyone involved in your move is on the same page, plan out all of the details ahead of time, and confirm those details with everyone. It is helpful to plan the following:

  • The deadline by which all items must be packed up, donated, sold, or thrown away.
  • What moving company (if any) will be used, along with the reservation details, payment information, and insurance coverage.
  • When you or your loved one will be an official resident of their new home.
  • What time the moving company will arrive, and approximately how long it will take them to load the moving truck.
  • The route the moving truck will take to the new destination.
  • Where the moving truck will park to unload your loved one’s items, and the route the movers will take to unload the items into your loved one’s space.
  • Who will tip the movers, and how much.

Having a detailed plan will ensure that there are no surprises outside of whatever the weather may throw at you on moving day. And if the plan is derailed by the winter weather, you can easily set up plan B.

Don’t be afraid to ask for help

It’s well-known that moving can be a strain, and a few extra pairs of hands can go a long way toward making it run a lot more smoothly. The good news is that nearly anyone you would like to ask for help has been through a grueling moving day or two themselves. So all of your friends and family will understand how much of a difference their help could make.

If anyone offers to help with the move, make sure that you give them a specific task to complete—that way, you’ll know exactly what tasks are getting checked off the list and what still needs to get done.

Take advantage of the Easy-Move Program

The transition to senior living or a memory care facility can be difficult when faced with the normal physical and financial obstacles caused by downsizing one’s home. To help alleviate some of the stress involved with this life-altering change, Marshall Pines offers a program that lessens the strain associated with moving. Caring and dedicated staff are available to assist new residents in matters such as real estate, financial services, moving professionals, veteran assistance, and more.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of Marshall Pines, contact our friendly team today.

Arizona’s Warm Climate is The Cherry on Top of Copper Canyon’s Luxury Memory Care Community

Winter weather can be nearly magical when snow flurries are falling from the sky. And nothing matches the excitement of a grade school child who has found out that several inches of snow have given them an extra day off of school. But winter quickly wears out its welcome when it’s time to shovel driveways, navigate icy sidewalks, or drive to the grocery store.

Yes, winter may look nice, but it poses its inconveniences that, in the wrong circumstances, can quickly turn into dangers. And for older adults, particularly those with Alzheimer’s or dementia, those dangers are even more pronounced.

That’s why relocating to Copper Canyon Assisted Living and Memory Care community in sunny Tucson, Arizona, is ideal for those needing daily assistance or memory care.

A milder climate means fewer cold-weather dangers

Snow and ice can be dangerous for anyone; slipping and falling is more common when sidewalks and stairs are slick with snow, sleet, or ice. But older adults living with dementia or Alzheimer’s may also have a lack of strength, lowered spatial awareness, or balance difficulties that add to the problem, making it more likely that they will slip and fall.

And colder temperatures are especially risky for people living with dementia or Alzheimer’s. Some individuals may find it hard to detect temperature changes outdoors or even in their homes if their heating system should fail. Because they may be less sensitive to temperature changes, and because they may need assistance choosing weather-appropriate clothing, these individuals are at a higher risk for hypothermia.

Fortunately, the average winter temperature in Tucson is between 66 and 70 degrees, meaning snow and ice are nearly unheard-of. In fact, forget hiding inside waiting for spring—Tucson has the perfect winter weather for lunch or a walk outdoors!

More sunlight and warmth may improve cognitive function

It has become widespread knowledge that changing seasons and exposure to sunlight can affect our moods. It turns out that the weather may have even more to do with how our brains work than we previously thought. In a study published in PLOS Medicine by Andrew Lim of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, authors found that older adults—both with and without Alzheimer’s—may be affected by the seasons. The study found that average cognitive function was higher in the summer and fall than the winter and spring—a difference that was equivalent to 4.8 years difference in age-related cognitive decline. In addition, they found that the odds of meeting the diagnostic criteria for mild cognitive impairment or dementia were higher in the winter and spring than in summer or fall.

With its mild climate and longer winter daylight hours, Tucson is the perfect place for older adults to avoid the detrimental cognitive effects that winter weather can have.

A live-in community means care is never far away

In areas where blizzards are a normal part of winter life, it is common for travel hiccups to occur as a result of winter precipitation. For seniors who require in-home care, that can mean a dangerous delay in receiving necessary care or medications. If a caretaker is unable to travel due to winter weather, individuals who rely on in-home care can be left alone without proper assistance.

At a memory care community, caring staff are available 24/7 to assist residents. There is no need to travel or to wait for care to arrive—it’s already there! And at Copper Canyon, residents receive Person-Centered Care that is fully customized to their needs, including options for health monitoring, medication management, assistance with dressing, bathing, grooming, and oral care.

While winter weather can be charming, it’s undeniable that a warmer climate like Tucson is better suited to seniors’ needs.

To learn more about residency or to schedule a tour of Copper Canyon, contact our friendly team today`